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Posted Sep. 18, 2020

Black Excellence Does Exist and It Lives in Our Kids

I’m guilty of saying Black boys and girls are failing in school—a good chunk of us are. Going forward, I’m committing to correcting that language…

By Tanesha Peeples

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Posted Sep. 17, 2020

Yes, White Teachers Still Need to Be Ready to Talk to Students About Race

“What’s the difference between a killing and a lynching?” The question popped up on my phone through the Google Hangouts app I installed in March.…

By Desiree Mitchel

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Posted Sep. 15, 2020

Kids Need to Write More. A Lot More.

Growing up with teachers for parents, my siblings and I were taught that writing is an indispensable skill. We attended rigorous schools and enrichment programs…

By Aigner Picou

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Accountability

How does the federal government support our public schools? Find out the ABC’s of ESEA, ESSA and No Child Left Behind →

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LIVE STREAM WEBINAR

EVENT OVERVIEW

Students of color comprise more than half of U.S. classroom populations, yet Black males make up just two percent of the teacher workforce. On Sept. 20, University of Phoenix, in association with the National Network of State Teachers of the Year (NNSTOY), will host a roundtable webinar to discuss steps to attract and retain Black males in the P-12 education workforce.
Moderated by Education Post, the webinar will bring together the voices of University researchers, NNSTOY fellows and Black male educators from local school districts to present the findings from a University-led white paper, entitled, “Having Our Say: Examining Career Trajectories of Black Male Educators in P-12 Education.” The panel will discuss potential solutions to improve students’ cultural and academic edification through diversifying the teaching profession.

OPENING SPEAKERS

John Ramirez
John Ramirez
Dean of Operations, University of Phoenix College of Doctoral Studies
Dr. Kimberly Underwood
Dr. Kimberly Underwood
University of Phoenix research chair for the Center for Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Research (CWDIR)
Lane Wright
Lane Wright
Director of Partnerships at Education Post

PANELISTS

Name
Dr. Kimberly Underwood
University of Phoenix research chair for the Center for Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Research (CWDIR)
Dr. Medgar Roberts
Dr. Medgar Roberts
Senior Fellow in the UOPX Center for Workplace Diversity and Inclusion Research and 2018-19 NNSTOY Outstanding Black Male Educators Fellow
Dr. Cliff Moon
Dr. Cliff Moon
Director of the AZ Multicultural Education Conference and Director of diversity and inclusion at Tempe Union High School District
Dr. Kevin Mendivil
Dr. Kevin Mendivil
Superintendent to Tempe Union High School District
Kareem Neal
Kareem Neal
Special Education Teacher at Maryvale High School and 2019 Arizona State Teacher of the Year
Dr. Eddie Moore
Dr. Eddie Moore
Founder/Program Director, The White Privilege Conference

AGENDA

4:45-4:50 p.m.

Welcome by John Ramirez, Dean of Operations, College of Doctoral Studies

4:50-5:00 p.m.

Opening remarks from Dr. Kimberly Underwood, lead author of the paper

5:00-5:45 p.m.

Panel discussion moderated by Lane Wright, Director of Partnerships at Education Post

5:45 p.m.

Q&A

INFOGRAPHIC

Achieving a diverse and inclusive P-12 workforce is critical to ensuring that students receive a robust, quality educational experience. However, overcoming the shortage of Black male teachers has been a dilemma for our nation’s schools for decades. Black males often don’t aspire to become teachers because of deterrents to the profession. Those who do face unique challenges. To ensure quality, equitable learning for all students, schools must recruit and retain Black male teachers by committing to paths that make it easier for that demographic to enter the profession. An infographic on the paper’s findings shares high-level insights from the research team.
INFOGRAPHIC
INFOGRAPHIC

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