Angelica Infante-Green

Commissioner, Rhode Island Elementary and Secondary Education

New York City, New York

Angélica Infante-Green is Rhode Island’s commissioner of elementary and secondary education. She is the first person of color to lead the state’s Department of Education.

Infante-Green previously served as deputy commissioner of the Office of Instructional Support P-12 in New York state. In New York, Infante-Green oversaw the Office of Bilingual Education and World Languages; the Data Systems and Educational Technology Office; the Office of Assessment, Standards, and Curriculum; the Office of Special Education; and the Office of District and School Review. During her tenure leading P-12 Instructional Support efforts, New York students made gains on both math and English assessments, and the state narrowed opportunity gaps for black and Latinx students. In her previous role as the associate commissioner for bilingual education and world languages, she spearheaded the release of the nationally-recognized Blueprint for English Language Learners’ Success, a statewide framework that establishes clear expectations for administrators, policymakers, and practitioners to prepare English Language Learners for academic success. Prior to her work at the New York State Education Department, she was executive director of the Office of English Language Learners and assistant superintendent of the New York City Department of Education under Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Chancellor Joel Klein.

She was a member of the inaugural cohort of the Chiefs for Change Future Chiefs program, which was created to address the lack of practical preparation for the complex job of leading state and large urban school systems. The program identifies some of the most talented, diverse emerging leaders, integrates them into a community of practice with current chiefs, and gives them a set of experiences and preparation that will enable education systems to choose skilled, ready leaders.

Infante-Green is the daughter of immigrants from the Dominican Republic and began her career as a public school teacher through Teach For America in New York City. She is married and has two children.

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