High Standards

Is my child learning what is needed to be successful?

Highbar2-font-alt

Even if our kids are coming home with straight “A”s, how do we really know if they’re learning what they need to succeed in college, in career, and in life? One teacher’s “A” could be another teacher’s “C”.

We need to have clear and consistent standards for what our kids should be learning.

That is the thinking behind the Common Core—a common set of high learning standards for kids.

They were developed by education leaders and experts from nearly every state, with feedback from thousands of principals, teachers, parents, and community members.

These standards give our teachers and our parents a roadmap to success in college and career for our kids. That’s how the Common Core State Standards were developed, and that’s what they are about.

The Common Core standards are not a curriculum. They don’t prescribe what is taught or how it is taught. Curriculum is a local decision. A teacher’s method is a classroom-by-classroom decision.

Change is hard, but we can’t afford to stand still. Our world is changing, and our students need to keep up. These standards represent a new bar, a higher bar, the right bar for what our kids should master in school.

And when you set a new bar of performance, you need a new measurement. That’s the importance of the assessments aligned to the new standards.

Tests help answer the question: Is my child learning?

Tests aligned to high standards help answer the question: Is my child learning the right stuff to be successful?

Parents need answers to these basic questions.

Our families need a roadmap to success for their child.

Posted Nov. 20, 2018

Poor Curriculum Is a Recipe for Disaster, Here’s How Schools Can Help Teachers Find and Use High-Quality Materials

Lately, I’ve seen a meme that keeps popping up on social media: “Telling a teacher to use a boxed curriculum is like forcing a chef…

By Kari Patrick

Read Post

Posted Sep. 25, 2018

Eighth-Graders Are Doing Fifth-Grade Work. No Wonder Our Kids Aren’t Ready for College.

I just read a report that, as a father, makes me question my own kid’s school. I mean, if these problems are happening in so…

By Lane Wright

Read Post

Posted Sep. 13, 2018

When Love Is Grounded in the Soft Bigotry of Low Expectations, It’s the Wrong Kind of Love

Teachers love their students. We see the joy they show every year as students return back to school, despite constant beat downs on their profession…

By Colin Seale

Read Post

Posted May 25, 2018

Does Standardized Testing Help Students?

Every state uses standardized tests to find out how students in public schools are doing. Federal law requires it. But why? And how do standardized…

By Lane Wright

Read Post

Posted Oct. 30, 2017

This Chicago Program Is Making Sure Families Know Their School Options

When we policy wonks talk about school choice, mostly we talk about big-picture ways to make choice more available, like creating charter schools or offering…

By Maureen Kelleher

Read Post

Posted Oct. 23, 2017

Kentucky’s Changing How Schools Are Judged and Here’s Why You Should Care

With the adoption of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), the marquee educational law that Congress passed in 2015, Kentucky stands ready to dramatically shift…

By Garris Landon Stroud

Read Post

Posted Oct. 10, 2017

From Last to Leading: How Chicago Public Schools Made the Leap

Thirty years after being labeled the worst school district in the nation and after two decades of fiscal crisis, Chicago Public Schools (CPS) welcomed more…

By Beth Swanson

Read Post

Posted Sep. 13, 2017

New York Times Makes AP Courses Sound Like a Waste for Low-Income Students of Color, Here’s What They Missed

The New York Times Magazine has its eye on education in America with its latest issue, but it has blinders on. Alina Tugend’s piece on…

By Rob Samuelson

Read Post

Posted Mar. 27, 2017

Critical Thinking Should Not Be a Luxury: 3 Strategies for Unleashing the Potential of Every Student

I read “The Scarlet Letter” in high school, and we sat in our rows and went through the same old exercises. We read it, summarized…

By Colin Seale

Read Post

Posted Mar. 10, 2017

My 4th- and 6th-Graders Are Reading the Same Book in School. Should I Be Worried?

My fourth-grader and sixth-grader are reading the same book in school right now. That’s right. The book is “The Lightning Thief.”  And what’s more, my…

By Erika Sanzi

Read Post

OUR NETWORK

Featured Posts

Posted June 11, 2019
Lonely young latina woman sitting on bed. Depressed hispanic girl at home, looking away with sad expression.

By the End of My Third Year, I Was in Therapy. We Must Start Taking Teachers’ Emotional Health Seriously.

We all know the female elementary school teacher stereotype, perhaps best portrayed by the iconic Jessica Day from New Girl: bubby, cheerful, exquisitely put-together, good,…

By Kristabel Stark

Read Post

Posted June 11, 2019
Young black girl reading book sitting on mum's knee outdoors

How Teachers and Families Can Help Students Build Reading Fluency Over the Summer

Summer is a time for trying new things. Summer can also be a time for falling backward on academic skills like reading fluency. Research shows…

By Cindy Jiban

Read Post

Posted June 12, 2019

When It Comes to College Graduation and Finding a Job, Mentors Make a Difference

I am living proof of the OneGoal motto: “College graduation. Period.” I’m a recent graduate of Southern Illinois University (SIU) of Carbondale where I studied…

By Jawon Mayberry

Read Post

Accountability

How does the federal government support our public schools? Find out the ABC’s of ESEA, ESSA and No Child Left Behind →

Browse by Date

Keep Up With
Education Post

Sign up for weekly emails featuring our top blog posts:

Want more? Get our morning update and join us in #Voices4Ed.

What We’re
Tweeting