The Atlantic

Posted Oct. 9, 2017

Education Is the Surest Path Out of Poverty, Even If The Atlantic Reports Otherwise

One of the favored tactics of education reform opponents is to blame underperformance of schools on problems we cannot easily solve in order to avoid…

By Peter Cunningham

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Posted Sep. 12, 2017

All the Black Kids Are Still Sitting Together in the Cafeteria

I attended a predominantly Latino grammar school. We were all friends for the most part—the Black students, Mexican students and the few White students that…

By Tanesha Peeples

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Posted Jan. 20, 2017

What The Atlantic Got Wrong About Charter Schools and Segregation

George Joseph’s article, What Betsy DeVos Didn’t Say About School Choice, claims that charter schools “have pushed more low-income, minority students into even more racially…

By Dirk Tillotson

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Posted Aug. 25, 2016

Want ‘Local Control’? Here’s Another Example of School Districts Failing to Support the Kids Who Need It Most

A new article in The Atlantic details another example of how the most needy kids in our schools are not getting the money that was…

By Caroline Bermudez

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Posted Aug. 11, 2016

Standards Can Help Fix Students’ Broken Moral Compass

A recent piece in The Atlantic, Students’ Broken Moral Compasses, describes a teacher’s attempt to help his students develop good character and learn morality and…

By Sarah M. Yost

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Posted Feb. 1, 2016

If I’d Had Common Core I Probably Wouldn’t Suck at Math Now

I’m terrible at math. In seventh grade, I became aware of my poor math preparation when I entered a team math competition against other Catholic…

By Caroline Bermudez

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Posted July 28, 2015

Opt-Out Closes the Door on Kids With Disabilities

Great read in The Atlantic about the alignment of disability advocates and civil rights leaders on the necessity of maintaining federal oversight, annual testing and accountability in a…

By Laura Waters

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Posted May 28, 2015

Hey Atlantic, Accuracy Matters Too

Anne Quito reports on design, not education, so perhaps it’s understandable that she’s not up to speed on the origin and implementation of the Common Core. Still, we’d hope that somewhere in The Atlantic’s editing and fact-checking process on her recent paean to penmanship, Why Cursive Mattered, someone would have pointed out this totally false premise in her introduction: Since the U.S. Department of Education dropped cursive…

By Education Post

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OUR NETWORK

Featured Posts

Posted Nov. 13, 2017

The Worst Thing About Being a Homeless Student Was the Hunger

Have you ever been so hungry that it caused you physical pain? I’m not talking the kind of hunger that sneaks up when you’ve realized…

By Lizzy Shoben

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Posted Nov. 10, 2017

Could This Teacher and Leadership Program Be Part of the ‘Secret Sauce’ for Chicago Schools?

In most urban school districts, “turnaround” is a dirty word. Turnaround schools are first identified as failing and left to languish for some time in…

By Maureen Kelleher

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Posted Nov. 13, 2017

I Didn’t Want My Students to Have to Choose Between Hunger and Making Friends

I have a weakness. I’m not good at saying no. Last summer, I was invited to attend a focus group on school breakfast at the…

By Angela Homan

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