Black Male Educators Speak

In partnership with Education Post, the Campaign for Black Male Achievement (CBMA) has launched the Black Male Educators Speak video series, focusing on the stories of four Black male teachers in four different cities and exploring the innovative teaching methods they use to engage Black students.

#BlackMaleEducatorsSpeak

To help young Black men and boys achieve their fullest promise and potential, CBMA has put a stake in the ground around high school excellence to ensure they’re positioned to graduate high school ready to succeed in college, career and their communities.

A key indicator found to help determine that success? Engagement.

Watch how these educators from Philadelphia, Detroit, New York, and Oakland share how they’re able to connect with their black male students’ personal and cultural experiences to encourage academic achievement.

How Do You Engage Black Male Students?Use the #BlackMaleEducatorsSpeak hashtag to share your creative methods for engaging Black male youth and earn as much as $300 for your ideas. Visit CBMA for more →

Chapter 1: Philadelphia


Gerald Dessus teaches a social justice class to eighth-graders at the Mastery Charter School Shoemaker Campus in West Philadelphia. See why Gerald teaches social justice →

Chapter 2: Detroit


Quan Neloms uses hip-hop to teach literature and critical thinking, engaging youth both in and out of the classroom at Detroit’s Douglass Academy for Young Men. See how Quan uses hip-hop in the classroom →

Chapter 3: The Bronx


Edmund Adjapong, Ph.D., engages Black youth in STEM through the use of hip-hop culture such as emceeing and graffiti art. Dr. Edmund tells you why hip-hop belongs in science class. →

Chapter 4: Oakland


Two educators from Oakland’s Office of African-American Male Achievement tell the real value of having Black men at the front of classroom. Brother Bankh Akintunde shares his own journey →

MORE: Personal Reflections From the Educators

Posted Oct. 30, 2017

VIDEO: In Oakland We Believe in the Greatness of Our Black Male Students

Imagine walking into a school every day and being taught by someone who looks like you. Imagine that person shares your upbringing, the music you listen to, or simply represents a living roadmap to the future—a walking embodiment of success.…

By Bankh Akintunde

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Posted Oct. 25, 2017

VIDEO: Meet the Bronx Educator Who Uses Hip-Hop to Teach Science

As a science teacher in the same school system where I attended elementary and high school, I have noticed a significant lack of engagement and what many call an aversion for learning science among Black male students.…

By Edmund Adjapong

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Posted Oct. 20, 2017

VIDEO: This Detroit Teacher Uses Hip-Hop Literacy to Engage His Students and the Community

I began teaching at 22. Back in my hometown of Detroit and fresh out of college, I thought I had all the answers.…

By Quan Neloms

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Posted Oct. 11, 2017

VIDEO: This Black Male Educator Teaches a Social Justice Class to Middle Schoolers in West Philly

Someone once asked me, “Why teach social justice to eighth-graders?” The answer is simple: As educators, we do not control the world our students face when they step outside of our classrooms. However, we are responsible for how prepared our students are to engage with that world.…

By Gerald Dessus

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Posted Nov. 13, 2017

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Posted Nov. 10, 2017

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Posted Nov. 13, 2017

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